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 Insu Health Design can provide peace of mind to temperature-sensitive medication users by providing them the means to protect their medication, no matter the situation.

Meet Insu Portable!

Power grid independent

Multiple charging options and 72 hour disconnected battery life

Prevents spoilage from overheating or freezing

Patent-pending precise temperature control technology

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Built for transportability and durability

Portable and TSA Friendly design with a multiple-month storage capacity

Keep your medication safe and protected at all times 

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Save money on replacements for damaged medication

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Avoid refill hassles

with your insurance provider

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Prevent medical complications from spoiled product use

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Secure your medication with accessibility control

 
 
 

Get Yours Now!

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No matter the issue, Insu Portable makes refrigerated storage simple and worry-free

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Fridges are made for food, not medicine

Household refrigerators have temperature temperature fluctuations for over 2.5 hours a day.

 

This can result in medication freezing, spoiling or degrading, as well as health complications and additional spending for the patient.

Braune et.al 2019. https://doi.org/10.1089/dia.2019.0046

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Cold chain transportation needs to be safer and more efficient

The biopharma industry loses approximately $35 billion annually as a result of temperature-control failures, according to IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science

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Power grid independence is a must

​Every year natural disasters kill around 90,000 people and affect close to 160 million people worldwide.

 

Furthermore, it's estimated that lack of access to proper insulin storage contributed to the death of over 900 diabetics during Hurricane Maria’s aftermath in Puerto Rico.

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Study and interviews